The Latest: Attorney: Compound suspects to plead not guilty

FILE - This Aug. 10, 2018, file photo shows a ramshackle compound in the desert area of Amalia, N.M. The five men and women found living in a ramshackle compound in northern New Mexico where a boy was found dead last year have been indicted on federal charges related to terrorism, kidnapping and firearms violations. The U.S. attorney's office in New Mexico announced the superceding indictment Thursday, March 14, 2019. (AP Photo/Brian Skoloff, File)

Attorneys say five former residents of a New Mexico compound will plead not guilty to charges that include conspiring to support planned attacks on federal law enforcement and government employees that never occurred

ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. — The Latest on charges against five former residents of a New Mexico compound (all times local):

6:10 p.m.

Attorneys say five former residents of a New Mexico compound will plead not guilty to charges that include conspiring to support planned attacks on federal law enforcement and government employees that never occurred.

In an email Thursday, Amy Sirignano also restated she and other defense attorneys were awaiting more information on charges in a superseding indictment before providing further comment.

The suspects were arrested in August amid the discovery of 11 hungry children found living in filth at the compound near Amalia, and the remains of one of the suspect's sons who suffered from seizures and whose mother reported him missing in Georgia.

All of the suspects, except the boy's father, have been charged with kidnapping.

An arraignment is scheduled for next Thursday.

___

1 p.m.

Federal authorities say five former residents of a New Mexico compound have been indicted on charges of conspiring on a plan to attack U.S. law enforcement officers and employees.

The charges in a superseding indictment Wednesday accuse the two men in the group — Siraj Ibn Wahhaj and Lucas Morton — of constructing a firing range at the Taos County compound to train others for attacks that never occurred.

The men and three women living at the site were arrested following an August raid that led to the discovery of 11 hungry children living in filth.

Authorities had been searching for Wahhaj's son, who authorities say had medical issues before he was kidnapped from his mother in Georgia and taken by the group to New Mexico. He later died at the compound.

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